On this day, a pictorial walk . . .

According to the National Park Service, The Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial’s “official dedication date is August 28, 2011, the 48th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, though the ceremony was postponed until October 16 due to Hurricane Irene.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a Baptist minister and social activist who became a notable figure during the U.S. civil rights movement from the mid-1950s until he was assassinated in 1968. He played a pivotal role in ending the legal segregation of African American citizens in the U.S., influencing the creation of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. He received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964, among other honors.

King’s memorial is the first to honor an African American individual on the National Mall. The space is a place to contemplate Martin Luther King, Jr.’s legacy: a non-violent philosophy striving for freedom, justice, and equality.”

Since the pandemic and other events prevent the majority of us from visiting our Nation’s capital at this time, here are just a few of his inspiring words etched in the walls of the memorial. I took these photos in 2019 at the height of the cherry blossom festival. As you can see, it was a beautiful day of which I have fond memories.

True peace is not merely the absence of tension; it is the presence of justice.—1958

Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly. —Alabama, 1963

The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.

I have the audacity to believe that people everywhere can have three meals a day for their bodies, education and culture for their minds, and dignity, equality, and freedom for their spirits. —Norway 1964

I believe that unarmed truth and unconditional love will have the final word in reality. This is why right, temporarily defeated, is stronger than evil triumphant. —Norway, 1964

We must come to see that the end we seek is a society at peace with itself, a society that can live with its conscience. —Alabama, 1965

If we are to have peace on earth our loyalties must become ecumenical rather than sectional. Our loyalties must transcend our race, our tribe, our class, and our nation, and this means we must develop a world perspective. —Georgia, 1967

We shall overcome because the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice. —District of Columbia, 1968

May you enjoy peace on this Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day and in the coming week!

Copyright ©2021 Lynn Broderick and the Single Leaf. All Rights Reserved.

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